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When natural gas companies approached Charlie Clark and Jim Barrett about the minerals under their farms, the northern Pennsylvania landowners in neighboring counties both decided to let them drill.

They hoped — like so many landowners — to bring in some extra cash.

For Clark, the decision has paid off. But Barrett says he feels cheated, and is now suing his gas company.

That disparity in how royalties are paid spans the Marcellus Shale, and it’s popping up in other oil- and gas-rich regions across the United States. It stems from a complex web of laws, court rulings and legal jargon that determines how money is distributed to property owners who allow energy companies to tap the minerals below their land.

Clark and Barrett might have started out with similar hopes, but their different experiences show how tough it can be for landowners to navigate the gas business — and how resolutions are hard to come by.

Continue reading this story at StateImpact Pennsylvania »

WATCH: Why Some Strike it Rich in the Natural Gas Patch, and Others Strike Out

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This story is produced in partnership with StateImpact Pennsylvania, a collaboration among The Allegheny Front, WESA, WITF and WHYY.